Showing you MY JUNK – Pictures Included!

5one9

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What vehicle(s) do you drive?
2007 Magnum SRT8, 1957 F100
It’s all part of the fun. The suspense. The intrigue. Stay stubborn.

Does the radiator itself clear everything?
 

Darius

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THE key issue to be finalized was similar to what a couple of you guys have also been dealing with, the mounting of your radiators. The stock Studebaker engine was a little 170 cubic inch flathead inline six which really didn’t require much cooling. The 512 CID, wide-ass Cadillac is a totally different animal. The new cooling requirements led to ditching the original core support/radiator locator in favor of a wider U-shaped piece of hardware whose job is:

1) Position (hold) the fenders together

2) Support the new aluminum double-pass, cross-flow, two row radiator

Of course everything has to be custom made as there are no “KITS” for this swap.

I looked at splitting the original core support to widen it but that lost traction. Next came a search for pieces of channel that might work and though usable sized were available they were too thick and heavy for the job. Finally, I settled of using welded angle iron pieces for the job.

Settling on radiator placement also deals with the ugly question of electric fan fitment. Simply put there ain’t no room to spare!

bro. d
 

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PJ McCoy

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THE key issue to be finalized was similar to what a couple of you guys have also been dealing with, the mounting of your radiators. The stock Studebaker engine was a little 170 cubic inch flathead inline six which really didn’t require much cooling. The 512 CID, wide-ass Cadillac is a totally different animal. The new cooling requirements led to ditching the original core support/radiator locator in favor of a wider U-shaped piece of hardware whose job is:

1) Position (hold) the fenders together

2) Support the new aluminum double-pass, cross-flow, two row radiator

Of course everything has to be custom made as there are no “KITS” for this swap.

I looked at splitting the original core support to widen it but that lost traction. Next came a search for pieces of channel that might work and though usable sized were available they were too thick and heavy for the job. Finally, I settled of using welded angle iron pieces for the job.

Settling on radiator placement also deals with the ugly question of electric fan fitment. Simply put there ain’t no room to spare!

bro. d
Nice, Make it work so you can drive that car. Who cares how it looks now. All these yrs past by and now your so close. Make it run, then make it pretty. My bet is after it is running, you will be spending so much time driving, that stuff that was once bothersome will be forgotten.
Hammer "D"own my friend. Ps. Don't forget videos.
Your favorite east coast board member who is not as handsome as some,
PJ
 

richie49

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Darius
Making any progress on putting that radiator setup in your car? And I thought I had it bad on my
corvair. You can allways put it in the back like I did! :oops:. With the mrkVIII fan it has got to cool it down.
Richard richie49
 

Caddylackn

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Has anyone seen my little red wagon? It has been missing. I can't seem to find it anywhere!



Why there it is......




1602698577537.png
 

Darius

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Hello Gentleman,

Thanks for your concerns. All is well.

Bottom line: I ain’t going nowhere. I’ve come too far to even THINK about giving up at this point. Full stop!

Truth is - a change came over me and her name isn’t Lena Horne. Her name is AHP 201XD and she can lay down the heat - as in TIG welding heat! https://ahpwelds.com/product/ahp-alphatig-201xd

Best I can figure the change is a result of finally having the ability to stick pieces of metal together, where in the past there were only tools to cut stuff apart. There is freedom that comes by being more in control of whatever the hell it is you are doing.

The challenge of fitting the radiator and fan into the Studebaker is still there but now days when there’s an idea to try I can build the darn thing. And if (when) it fails, that’s okay too because the NEXT approach is just a few cuts and welds away.

Here’s where things are currently: the new core support doesn’t work as hoped. The old core support was, and still, is a non starter. What is new is the realization that the first element to get firmed up is Radiator Placement - based on fan options. In my mind it was all attached to first getting the core support right. Wrong Approach!

It is very doubtful that the Lincoln MK8 fan can be wedged in between the radiator and engine. So, I dug through my supply of original metal flex fans and mounted one. All in all it looks very promising. Radiator first, combined with fan, followed by the core support being a solo thought.

More later. By the way, what’s wrong with having the wheels still on the wagon? And as far that that handle goes, you stroke what you want to stroke and I fondle that nice, long, black handle.

bro. d
 

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Darius

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Crazy approach: Mount the big Lincoln Mk8 fan in front of the radiator as a pusher. Issues are that the fan motor is not reversible, nor is the fan blade. So, modify the carefully crafted radiator shroud to work in the pushing mode (needs work), which keeps the motor and fan blade turning the right way. That flipping Mk8 has some power! With it just sitting on the radiator face the darn thing tried to become a hovercraft and scooted off.

bro. d
 

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Caddylackn

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The beauty of having a good welder and some basic welding skills, is it makes you fearless when cutting and fabbing knowing you can repair it if you guess wrong. It only cost some time, wire and a lil' inert gas. This saves you a lot of time on the overthinking everything out process before cutting. A grinder smoothing and a can of spray paint, and who's to know what your previous attempt was? You can also just cut everything out of the way, install what you need to, now you got something to measure off of, measure, cut, then tack everything back together to make sure it works. If it does, then weld 'er up. This is a totally different approach, then figuring everything out perfect, before the first cut.

Nothing wrong with a little pre-bent steel going in and saving you some time (wagon). I have seen a bunch of True Value wheel barrow firewall tubs, but this is the first red wagon I've seen. Another thing you can use is the later model pickup gas tank skid plate that wraps around the whole bottom of the plastic gas tank. These have nice rounded corners and are like 16 gauge steel or thicker. Something you can pick up for cheap next time you are at the junkyard.

You can use the Mark VIII fan as a pusher if you move it in front of the radiator but keep it oriented in the same direction and mount it from the back side (electric motor side) of the fan. So the fan would still be turning the same direction. It looks like you have it figured out. The shroud around the blades would have to be tight to the radiator so most of the pushed air makes it through the radiator. Now you have a bird Cuisinart.
 

Darius

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The beauty of having a good welder and some basic welding skills, is it makes you fearless when cutting and fabbing knowing you can repair it if you guess wrong. It only cost some time, wire and a lil' inert gas. This saves you a lot of time on the overthinking everything out process before cutting. A grinder smoothing and a can of spray paint, and who's to know what your previous attempt was? You can also just cut everything out of the way, install what you need to, now you got something to measure off of, measure, cut, then tack everything back together to make sure it works. If it does, then weld 'er up. This is a totally different approach, then figuring everything out perfect, before the first cut.
Nothing wrong with a little pre-bent steel going in and saving you some time (wagon). I have seen a bunch of True Value wheel barrow firewall tubs, but this is the first red wagon I've seen. Another thing you can use is the later model pickup gas tank skid plate that wraps around the whole bottom of the plastic gas tank. These have nice rounded corners and are like 16 gauge steel or thicker. Something you can pick up for cheap next time you are at the junkyard.

You can use the Mark VIII fan as a pusher if you move it in front of the radiator but keep it oriented in the same direction and mount it from the back side (electric motor side) of the fan. So the fan would still be turning the same direction. It looks like you have it figured out. The shroud around the blades would have to be tight to the radiator so most of the pushed air makes it through the radiator. Now you have a bird Cuisinart.

LOL on that "bird cuisinart," and ditto on everything you said in the first paragraph.

My pusher mockup of the Mark 8 fan is an example of your point about not overthinking a problem, but just going for something. The exercise allowed me to get measurements and make a trial fitment.
Still, regardless of which fan, mounted where, my focus is to drive the darn car! No paint, no interior, basic to the bone wiring, working powertrain and brakes are all that will be needed heading into winter.

Best,

bro. d
 

Caddylackn

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My project had me so overwhelmed for so many years I never could make any real progress, because I just got lost on what to focus on when I would spend half a day to work on it. I'd go back and forth between like 5 or 10 different things and never really accomplish anything.

What has helped me considerably, and my project has been going on for like 25 years, was to actually write a list of all the tasks needed to finish my car enough to drive and enjoy it. Not every little task, but like tasks grouped together like:

1. Clean and prime floor boards,
2. Install carpet
3. Install seats, Fix door panels
4. Sand down old paint
5. finish welding sheet metal, fix fender skirts
6. Remove rest of trim
7. Primer coat
8. Block sanding hell
9. Sealer Coat
etc, etc etc.

Then making this list into a list of critical paths, like on my list #1 is obviously before #2, and #5 before #6 etc. Then figure out which one is the first thing you have to do before you can finish the other tasks.
Then write down what you need to purchase, or borrow, steal, etc. to make this one task (your critical path) happen.

Then buy the f.n. parts or tools you need for this one task.
Then just focus on working on this one task. If you are waiting for parts or something, you can look to the next task, but just focus on the one task. This is the critical path that is currently preventing you from moving forward. Small steps. Don't think about any of the other tasks coming up.
By doing this simple thinking, I was not so overwhelmed and I could get something done by just focusing on the one thing.
And now this is the best part:
- I would finish a task/critical path, which seemed like such a big deal for so many years thinking about it, then I finished it, and I crossed it off the f.n list. That is about the best feeling ever.
As you go from one task to the next, cross it off the list, and keep the list so you can see what you have accomplished. Many of the tasks in my critical path weren't that hard to accomplish once I was focused and had the materials on hand.
If something on the list is not in the critical path of another I circle it, so I can do it when I am waiting for something or I am stalled on another task. Somedays when something goes wrong, the next day just pick an easy task to get some confidence back up.

Doing this has led me to make more progress in the last 5 months than I did in the previous 20 years.

So, Darius, what is your critical path to move forward right now? Radiator/fan/cooling, then what's next?

Your project is on a greater scale then mine since almost all the work is custom. I recommend that you do NOT worry about painting anything until you get this running and driving the way you want. Except I would paint the engine bay if the motor is out for any reason.

Once this is a driving car and you get sick of looking at the "patina" and weld grinds then worry about paint.
My 2 cents.
 

Darius

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CRITICAL PATH!! NOW you tell me!! Where the heck have you been for the past 18 years???

Kidding aside, I admire your structured approach to getting a project finished. Having a logically considered plan, with identified critical paths, is bound to help a build move smoothly, and rapidly. Then, there's my approach. "What end am I working on today?" The middle of the car is of little consequence as all of the action is at one end or the other. I knew what I wanted but without any knowledge of the possible obstacles, or how to overcome them, it was do what you can, the best that you can.

My past experience has been with building a few engines, with a focus on forced induction and fuel injection, both mechanical and electronic. There have been some engine swaps into other brands, V8's replacing four cylinder and six cylinder engines, big V8s replacing small V8s, but absolutely nothing on the scope of this Studebaker AWD project.

The idea for the project was simple:

put the biggest engine (Caddy 500) into a small, light car,

do my first ever twin turbocharger setup,

fuel inject the thing using "liquid" propane (the first fuel choice) later replaced by E-85,

go with the strongest four speed automatic transmission,

couple that to the strongest AWD transfer case,

ending at the back in a strong, limited slip, independent rear suspension setup.

Oh, and go really, really big on brakes!

The hope was to have traction to match the expected engine output, coupled with a pleasant ride in something non-cookie cutter, but different, like a 1950 Studebaker bullet nose 4 dr sedan.

I already owned the engine after having swapped it into a mid-size Oldsmobile '79 Toronado, so that part of my critical path was known. So, what car to use and what frame to put under that car? My real world "normal" life required lots of research to accomplish the goal, making that a familiar approach for the needed components. They were identified by their intended need/use, purchased over time on my limited budget, then placed on shelves in the garage or under the kitchen table in boxes for later use.

How am I doing so far with a critical path?

Each sourced part, whether from a bone yard or store bought was carefully considered. Fuel pressure regulator, A/N fittings, special extremely high volume injectors, special stainless steel lined fuel filters, each approached the same critical way. And so it has been with just about every part on this car. What had been a 1985 Chevy S10 standard cab, long bed, 4wd with a 2.8 V6 was chosen for the frame fitment beneath the Stude, and its 4x4 front drive components. But gone now are the original torsion bars, replaced with specific coilover shocks. That’s just an example but the list goes on, and on, and on.

I think it not much of an overstatement to say that every nut, bolt, washer, bushing, bearing, spring or cotter pin has been replaced, often cleaned to shinny bare metal, then primed and painted.

This shit takes time and energy, both of which are in diminishing supply. Did I forget to mention money?

Finally this labor of “love and hate” is close to being on the road. Sure, it will look like crap but I honestly don’t care. I’m the junkie in need of a long overdue fix. The craving for that trust of unending torque, the adrenalin of “what the hell did I get myself into this time?” are within sight and however real my limitations, I’m going for it.

That, My Good Brother, is my critical path. I appreciate your encouragement and that of our little band of brothers here on the forum.

Best,

Bro. “Proud to know you guys,” d
 
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USSCADY

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What vehicle(s) do you drive?
1975 Coupe DeVille
I think that is really sharp, but I have been tending towards blue for whatever my next project is...
I haven't said much on this forum but really have enjoyed and learned a lot over the years. My Coupe DeVille followed me out to California 2 years ago when the garage at my rental house burned with my '69 DeVille Convertible project in it. Convertible was amazingly undamaged and I give a lot of credit to the silver Car Jacket that it was in and of course God for burning up only what I didn't really need. It took me a year to use the R4 compressor from Greg Siurfas. It took me a week just to replace the rear springs in this beast as I decided to get taller springs to deal with a big trailer hitch and a heavy sound system. You are making great progress Darius. You deserve to hear it run! That will inspire you past whatever challenges await.
 

53 Studillac

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Darius,

From what I can tell from the pictures you are just a fabricated shroud away from having a bullet proof solution with that factory water pump mounted fan! I'd wager it will move a lot of air. Keep up the progress. And I love those valve covers ;-)

Dwayne
 

mario

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Hey Dwayne, I'm old enough to remember why you love those vavle covers...stay healthy my friends.
Ciao,
Mario
 

Darius

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So, this is going to work!

For now the old fashioned engine driven flex fan will get the little daily driver on the road - and that works for me.

Other pictures show a nice shiny black piece of sheet metal that sits in front on the radiator and over the famed “Bullet Nose” of this year’s model. The official name for the piece is “the upper radiator air deflector” and that names tells what it does. It neatly directs all incoming cooling air to the radiator core. As might be expected a piece of sheet tin for a 1950 Studebaker can be hard to find but a rusty example was found and it gets to be the “test case” for the trimming needed to fit the new aluminum crossflow radiator.

Months ago I bought two “contour finders” to help fashion the rear IRS cradle but is one used here to follow the curves of the air deflector so the trim job while maintaining the cut depth. https://www.amazon.com/General-Tool...K4PG9CY09WR&psc=1&refRID=BJ76AZPM3K4PG9CY09WR

With the surface rust scribed the next step is the cut away.

More shortly.

bro. “making progress” d

PS Of course the simple way of keeping my cut line straight would be to put down a length of painter's tape. What a thought. LOL at myself!
 

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