Showing you MY JUNK – Pictures Included!

5one9

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2007 Magnum SRT8, 1957 F100
That red one is unreal
 

richie49

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Darius
Picking a color for your car isn't going to be easy! You do want it to look good but how much you want it to stand out when those hairdriers spool up?
Richard richie49 I like the red!
 

Darius

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We may be seeing a theme here for silver.

While I love that red Stude, with its California Custom (expensive) wheels, BUT some mutant ethnic gene quickens my pulse for that purple/rose example. However. that gleaming, brilliant, ludicrous and tasteful silver is my final answer . ....
— IF that exact color can be matched. Another factor will be COST! A monthly social security check can stretch only so far.
 
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5one9

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I would call that dark silver. You can’t really get a bead on it in that pic. Can you find more pics of the same car?
 

Caddylackn

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I have good luck with the Urethane Single Stage Summit paints with a clear coat. If they have your color, the quality and spray-ability of their single stage paint for novices is pretty good. Their clear is pretty good also, as is their urethane primer surfacer. Their epoxy primers are about the cheapest around, especially when they are on sale. The Two stage paints are so expensive, I haven't used them.

I don't like the Eastwood brand of single stage, since they don't sell the colors in the full gallon, it is like only 3/4 gallon. It makes a full gallon only when mixed with the activator. To do a full size car and jams then you need to buy 3 of their "gallons" and three quarts activators to make sure you don't run out and have enough for touch up. These single stage urethane paints do not require much or any reducer so don't count on padding up the quantity for spraying with reducer. These urethane paints are pretty thin and reducer only brings down the coverage and requires more coats.

I am pretty sure that both Eastwood and Summit paints are both Kirker brand, and you can buy them in other places.
 

Caddylackn

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Here is a paint chip of the Platinum Silver by Summit Paint Single Stage Urethane. I do like this color for an older car. These paint chips are not accurate but close. You could always buy a quart and a hardener and shoot it on a test piece. I like this color since it accents body lines by showing high and low points as a different color. Since it is a metallic paint you would have to shoot a clear over it. You can't color sand metallics.
platinum silver.jpgplatinum silver.jpg
 

Darius

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Bro. Caddylackn, and Others,

Since I know nothing about painting a car, other than the hardest part is the preparation, what would you recommend for a "coating" for body parts that were just sandblasted? While the humidity level here and the Great Salt Desert is comparatively low, thing can rust. Two weather stations can't agree on much of anything so one indicates 19% while the second one says 24%.

Not knowing which paint type, single or double (Sounds like Oreo's), Urethane or John Deere, I need something an inexperienced applier can spray to protect the bare metal.

Thanks in advance,

bro. d
 

PSYKO_Inc

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What vehicle(s) do you drive?
66 Cadillac Miller-Meteor Duplex
Epoxy primer is what you want for bare metal. Most every paint manufacturer has their own line of epoxy, if you know what brand of paint you will be using you can go with the same company to guarantee compatibility, but generally they're all pretty compatible, especially if it's more than a couple weeks between primer and paint. It'll be a 2 part mix, and you can spray it as-mixed for high build, or add reducer to thin it down to spray over completed bodywork as a sealer. I've used the Custom Shop stuff before, sprayed the back end of my truck after bodywork back in 2009, with the intent of painting "sometime next year." Here we are 11 years later, still not painted. Black primer has faded to grey from the sun, but no rust or delamination, so it can definitely hold up to the elements.
 

5one9

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NAPA and others sell wipe-on metal prep. Works great.
 

5one9

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Nah. I'm sticking with the red for my choice. And the new GM truck metallic red/burgundy is beautiful.
 

PJ McCoy

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Silver-blue???
I'm Sold!!! Let's ride. Hey, Will keeping it below 3.5k rpms mean you only have 700hp to work with. I really don't like the thought of 1000 HP air friction peeling that beautiful paint off the car. Lol
 

Caddylackn

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Bro. Caddylackn, and Others,

what would you recommend for a "coating" for body parts that were just sandblasted? While the humidity level here and the Great Salt Desert is comparatively low, thing can rust.

Not knowing which paint type, single or double (Sounds like Oreo's), Urethane or John Deere, I need something an inexperienced applier can spray to protect the bare metal.

Thanks in advance,

bro. d
For bare metal, I would shoot everything with an epoxy primer with the required catalyst. About $100 for the Summit epoxy primer and catalyst would get you two gallons mixed. You can go over that with a body filler or high build surfacer primers. Or instead of epoxy primer you could use an etching primer on the bare metal, than a high build surfacer primer, which would save you a little money. The epoxy primer is the best way to prevent any rust return, moisture can't get through it. You can also use epoxy primer as a sealer primer sprayed right before final paint, so pick a epoxy color that will minimize the amounts of the final color coats. Use grey for dark silvers, or white for light silver.

You can get a Harbor Freight $15 HVLP gun to shoot this that would work great for epoxy primer. You would need a compressor with at least 4 - 5 cfm at 30 -40 psi, which isn't huge.
https://www.harborfreight.com/air-t...oz-hvlp-gravity-feed-air-spray-gun-62300.html
Just clean out all the horrible oils out of the gun that they packed it with.
 

Darius

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Bro. Caddylackn,

Thanks to you and the other good gentlemen of the forum for the input.

I have two unused Harbor Freight HVLP guns, each somewhat more expensive than that $15 version. The old compressor works and can easily do the 30 -40 psi but the air volume might be on the edge. Although we have low humidity here in the Salt desert water does collect in the tank and requires draining from time to time. The wish list has long included a dryer/filter setup but everything else has come before it.

One thought: I also have a 20 LB CO2 bottle that is used in place of the compressor at times. The siphon tube is the short variety and the CO2 is food grade. Therefore there are no moisture problems or particles to worry about. Has anyone ever used CO2 instead of air for painting purposes?? Twin regulator/gauges allow pressure to be whatever you want.

About protecting the freshly sandblasted body panels: can (should) that wipe-on metal prep be used under the epoxy primer??

bro. "about to get messy," d
 

Caddylackn

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I don't think metal prep would be a problem, but I would read the instructions on the Epoxy primer which should tell you what you can and can't spray it over. I would still go over all surfaces with a painting prep cleaner or Acetone before spraying epoxy. If the metal prep leaves a coating it may need to be scuffed for good adhesion to the metal. I think I used metal prep over bare metal patch panels under the epoxy primer on my '61.

Some HVLP guns sold at Harbor Freight are really high volume, like 10 - 12 cfm operating which takes a big compressor. So check your gun specs. I would try just shooting thinner or water with your gun and see if your compressor can keep up without seeing the pressure drop or flow out of the gun drop after a 10 second pull. Since this is not finish coat, if the pressure drop is minimal over a panel, not much harm done. You can wait after each pass for the compressor to catch up, it is just annoying. If there are epoxy paint spits or runs on your surface not a big deal. They will get sanded down during the Primer Surfacer sanding stage. Epoxy primer will sand nicely when cured.

I wouldn't recommend using the CO2 bottle for paint. A 4 cfm gun shooting for 10 minutes is a full 40 cf. That is a medium size CO2 tank full. The epoxy cures off the catalyst so I don't think CO2 would be an issue, but the low temperature of the gas through the gun could be an issue. Normally compressed air of the compressor is hot/warm. Coming straight off the CO2 tank it will be very cold expanding out the gun at 4 cfm and could have icing issues at the nozzle.
 
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