Exhaust and Air Induction Update...

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Anonymous

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This is a picture of the air induction engine cover.  Obviously some bondo and metal beating remain in the future.  The air cleaner element sits on an aluminium plate attached to the carb which also carrys a duct back to the original Corvair engine cooling air plenum.  The two step engine cover will have air seals to the air cleaner plate allowing it to float with the engine.




This is an overall view of the entire exhaust system.  It is oriented the way it will go into the car.  Exhaust outlets are located just in front of the rear wheels.  Given the car's tight quarters, the only practical way to run the exhuast was forward.




Here is another view of the exhaust system.  Because of the space constraints, I choose to build my own muffler.  The collectors are actually part of the muffler assembly.  I didn't have room for a round collector, and had to arrange the piping in a flat configuration.  I'm hoping that this doesn't cost too much performance.  The cross sectional area of the collector exit is carried all the way through the muffler.  The gas path is from the collector to the muffler center where left and right exhaust flows are combined.  The path is split and carried back to the two exit points.  All gas path bends are generous radii.  The outer walls of the gas path radii are sheet steel, the inside radii and all straight walls are perforated sheet.  The flow path looks effective, but it remains to be seen if any actual muffling occurs.




A rear view of the air induction engine cover.  Down inside the plenum the inlet opening of the duct up to the air cleaner can be seen.  The original Corvair holes from the plenum to the engine compartment have been plated over, so the air pressure in the plenum will be available to the carb.




Another shot of the exhaust system.  This is my first attempt to build either headers or a muffler.  Its been fun, and the results seem to be reasonable.  The muffler is only 2-1/8" thick.  The extended hanger mounts are in case I need to add a heat shield in the future.  To all of the guys who have been protesting the lack of factory headers for their particular projects I'll say don't be afraid...  After all, if you can get factory headers, it just means that you are doing something ordinary.  :soapbox:
 

Sean

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Thats some wild fab work :thumbup: Looks real nice. Are there any baffles in the muffler section?  Are there any welded in webs inside the muffler portion?  I knew some circle burners that built their own box style muffler and they blew it out because they didn't have any webbing welded into it to keep it together.

How do you like that combo roll, shear, brake that is in the background?
 

dave brode

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Doug,
I no longer consider myself to be the king of "lets's see how complicated I can make this project". LOL.
Seriously, I have some idea of the time you have in that work. Good job.
Dave
 
 
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Anonymous

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Sean...

No baffles in the sense that gas path walls are parallel to flow, not crosswise.  Because the flow is directed towards the center, combined, and then redirected back to the outside of the case, the incoming and outgoing gas flows are parallel and opposite.  I made the walls that separate the incoming and outgoing flows of perforated steel sheet.  My theory is that the lowest restriction is the major flow path, but excess pressure from the pulsations will bleed through the holes of both walls and equalize the instantaneous pressure, which is the noise.  Sort of a multipath averaging.  Whether this works at all, remains to be seen.

The walls of the gas path, both solid and perf are folded and welded to the muffler body sheets.  Hopefully, this internal top-to-bottom tie will keep the body from ballooning or blowing out.  Again, this remains to be seen.  I've got to get a few more things done before I get to fire up the engine.  Combo brake sheer very useful.  If I could afford it, I'd get one that is a bit heavier, as I always seem to be working it at its limits.  Nonetheless, very useful, and well worth the money.

Dave...

Believe it or not, this approach seemed to be the easiest.  Every other way I considered to get the spent gases out of the car looked even tougher except one.  That idea was to run eight tubes straight up through the roof with eight flap caps on them.  I was afraid that would get me more attention than I really want.  And from the wrong people.
 
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I love it.. :thumbup:
My only thought is on the sheet metal engine cover. Have you given any thought into the firberglass cloth that the ricers use for their stuff. They strech it over the frame work and soak it with resin, let it dry and do some sanding to get a smooth surface that they then paint. Might be easier that bondo.
 
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Anonymous

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73C...

Yes, I did consider fiberglas.  I chose to use steel because the transverse bulkhead behind the seats and the engine cover are my firewall.  The 'glas would be lighter and could be made much swoopier, but I am greatly enamored of the idea of being able to stop the car from speed and getting out before flame breaks into the cockpit area.  Silly, I know, but strong personal preference.
 
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I mean cover the steel with the glass. I would have also built a steel bulk head and bet I could get out faster than you in case of fire.................................
Maybe glass over glue on insulation for heat reduction.
 
A

Anonymous

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I think Mr Century is saying cover the painted steel with something like "dynamat" used for sound deadening then make a mould of that out of fiberglass and finish the mould.
It would make riding alot quieter by reducing engine/road noise and you could hear the radio and or ems vehicles
dunno if its gonna be loud but im guessing it will be.
Nice fab work BTW
JW

You could cover the fiberglass in tweed or whatever material your gonna use for interior and it would look swoop as hell...imo
 
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Anonymous

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I was planning on dynamat (or a clone) in the insides of the engine cover parts and the bulkhead.  My original plan was to simply upholster the bulkhead and engine cover, so the appearance of the surface wouldn't be important.

I don't know if I qualify for membership in the CSOB club discussed elsewhere on the site, but I am certain that I belong to the SSOB group. (Sick SOB)  Here's proof:  I am growing to like the overall shape of the engine cover/air cleaner.  I have been thinking about omitting the upholstery on the engine cover and painting it black.  (The outside of the car will be the rudest yellow I can find...)  I would then paint a flame job on the engine cover inside the rather than on the outside like everybody else does.  I could even carry it through the back window onto the rear deck lid.  Strange, unusual, and in my opinion, worthy of qualification for the SSOB club.
 
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Anything but yellow......please

Yellow=scared ....even back to Roman times
 

cadiwumpas

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  Yellow= They'll see you comin. :eyepopping: Or I could be wrong :shhh: thinking that they'll
be hearing you first. :thumbup: Either way qualifies for "sic"
 

Maddog

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Doug---thats one of the coolest exhaust systems I have ever seen......beautiful. Cant wait to see how it works.....
 
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Anonymous

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Yeller?

The car that I racked up the most speeding tickets in was yeller.

~JM~
 

cadillac512

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    Doug-
  Great job! You are indeed sick. :yes:Congratulations.

    As for the yellow......I ain't skeered.That's fer the feller in the other lane... ;)
  Terry
 
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Anonymous

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:)Thats a pretty wild layout.  I installed a 1990 4.5 transverse in the rear of my '65 Corvair CORSA.  Been on the road since 1995.  When you're on the road the corvair guys would like to see your creation.
 

cooke

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I cannot imagine the hours that have been spent on just the exhaust portion alone. Looks pretty "trick" to me. You make Lil' John Buttera look like a "Girl-Scout"....... Cooke.
 
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