Blow me

48Austin

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What is the difference. Under drive, 1:1, or over drive? I understand over drive will produce more heat. But if you are stuffing more air into the cylinder, wether it be under, over, or 1:1. Doesn't it all produce heat? And what are the power advantages between the three?
 

gordon

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All blowers heat the air if any kind of boost is made. Some times even when no boost is made. Under drive is when the speed of the blower is less than the crank speed which is driving it. Overdrive is when the blower is driven faster than crank speed. What size engine are you putting the blower on, what size is the blower? I will run you through the math , you will see it quickly and understand.
 

48Austin

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I understand the difference and the heat. But what does under driven really mean? If I am stuffing air into a space that wasn't designed for it. It's all overdriven. It doesn't matter the blower speed. It is still forcing air into the cylinder. Period.
 

kzhurley

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Overdriven simply means that the blower rpm is turning faster than crankshaft speed..
Underdriven is blower rpm less than crankshaft speed. Thats it.
 

48Austin

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I understand that. But it is still forced air. So the engine is always being overdriven. Just like a goose or duck to make "Fagua". If you run a blower you are forcing air into the engine.
 

Darius

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I understand that. But it is still forced air. So the engine is always being overdriven. Just like a goose or duck to make "Fagua". If you run a blower you are forcing air into the engine.
As a point of clarity: it is the supercharger which is being over driven and not the engine. Such over speeding MIGHT result in the engine being overfed - as in your example of the sacrificial duck or goose. However, for any "force feeding" of an engine to occur we must consider the relative sizes of the blower and the engine, while factoring in the mechanical tightness of either or both. :geek: (still on post surgical meds o_O )

Out of curiosity, were you a philosophy major, or a member of a school debate team, or are you a man who has lost too many arguments with his wife? I am.:lipsaresealed:

bro. "jus sayin'" d ;)
 

48Austin

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You know what I mean.
 

gordon

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Yes more air and fuel (mixture) is able to be put into the combustion chamber than would be available in the Naturally Aspirated mode operating at standard air.(14.7 PSI standard air at sea level 69*F, 29.92 barometric).
 
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